Great Eastern Ranges Initiative

We are one of seven organisations in NSW and the ACT working to restore wildlife habitat and connect vegetation remnants across the landscape.

Patching holes in the fabric

Habitat fragmentation is a significant threat to the long-term survival of many native species. The Great Eastern Ranges Initiative (GER) seeks to address this critical issue by bringing together people and organisations to protect, link and restore healthy habitat across 3,600 kilometres from Victoria to far North Queensland.

Working with others

We are one of seven organisations in NSW and the ACT working to restore wildlife habitat and connect vegetation remnants across the landscape.

  • On the North Coast, we are working with others to understand and manage fire to nurture an endangered emu population. Emus used to occur on the coast from Port Stephens to Ballina, but there are now only about 130 individuals left. Emus are extinct in most areas in the region but populations survive in Yuraygir National Park, in some coastal parts of the Clarence Valley, and south of Casino. 
  • In the Border Ranges, we are working with landholders using fire to restore grassy habitat for the eastern bristlebird, Hastings River mouse and eastern chestnut mouse. There are possibly only 30 individual eastern bristlebirds left in the northern population, and both the mice species are also rare. Restoring habitat will be critical for these species’ long-term prospects.
  • In the Greater Blue Mountains, we are raising awareness of bell miner associated dieback (BMAD), which can kill large stands of eucalypt forest. We are exploring research opportunities and developing strategies to tackle this emerging issue, including through the careful use of fire.
  • On the Dorrigo Plateau, we are working with landholders to highlight good fire management practices that will enhance the natural and agricultural values for the area. Learn more.

About GERI

GERI is one of the largest conservation partnership projects in the world. It aims to support biodiversity by creating opportunities for species in a 3,600-kilometre corridor to move, adapt and survive the environmental challenges that threaten them. Learn more

 

 

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